August 2016 Impact Report
By Meredith Boles
Introduction by Steve Wagner


In this Impact Report, Meredith Boles describes a conversation that took place at JFA’s new Stop and Think Exhibit (shown below), illustrating how the public display of abortion images, a gracious manner, and thoughtful responses to tough questions can help pro-choice advocates “stop and think” about abortion in a new way. 

Meredith and another UCLA student talk in front of JFA's new Stop and Think Exhibit in May 2016.

Meredith also shares what it was like for her club, Live Action UCLA, to partner with JFA to carry out large JFA events on the UCLA campus two years in a row.  We cherish the hard work of Meredith, Ines, and other members of their club who share our passion for creating hundreds of conversations about abortion in a single day of outreach.  Meredith and Ines helped invite JFA to campus, participated in conversations themselves, and rallied other club members to participate.  The result?  Together, JFA and Live Action UCLA trained more pro-life advocates and reached more pro-choice advocates than either organization could ever have done on its own.

P.S. This Impact Report is the second in a series showcasing our newly-expanded large exhibit outreach program, which also includes another new exhibit that was displayed at UCLA, The Art of Life.  For an introduction to both new exhibits, including more pictures, see JFA’s July report, “Two New Exhibits: A First Look.”

-Steve Wagner, Executive Director


The Story

I just graduated from UCLA, and throughout my four years there I was actively involved with the pro-life group.  In both my third and fourth years, I coordinated with Justice For All so that we could bring them onto our campus for a training seminar and then for an outreach event.  I cannot recommend JFA enough for a club event that is both educational for club members and influential for our peers on campus. 

Throughout this past year I had to meet periodically with the staff of the club events office in order to get the training sessions and the outreach exhibits approved, as well as to reserve outdoor spaces, classrooms, equipment, parking, etc.  This process was difficult at times because it was very obvious that the campus administration was not pleased with our event, so it felt like I was pulling teeth at times. It was also difficult because not everyone in my club was comfortable with the idea of displaying graphic images of abortion, and so I did not have enthusiastic support from all my club members.  But with their consent, and the help of two club members who were fully on board, combined with the guidance and assistance from the JFA staff, and the conviction that this was a great opportunity for my last year in college, we made all of the arrangements. 

Every person, whether it is the pro-choice student who is standing in front of me, or the unborn baby in a mother’s womb, has dignity and ought to be loved.
— Meredith

We had one day of training on a Sunday, and then two days of outreach at two different locations.  We needed one club member at all times present at the exhibit, and we used a group chat to coordinate this.  All of my club mates told me afterwards that it was a great experience, that they had some tricky conversations, some fruitful conversations, and that by the end they felt much more confident about having these conversations.

I myself had a very good conversation with a student named Amanda.  She was walking slowly past Justice For All’s Stop and Think Exhibit when I asked her what she thought of the exhibit.  She said she didn’t really understand what it was about, so I offered to walk around it with her and explain it.  We walked slowly, side by side.  Once we had circled around I asked Amanda what she thought.  She replied, “I know it’s a tricky issue.  It’s really hard to know.  I just think it should be up to the mother.  Do you think that abortion should be illegal even if the mother couldn’t afford to have the baby?”

Meredith interacts with a fellow UCLA student in front of the side of the Stop and Think Exhibit focused on feminism and women's rights.

I wasn’t sure if Amanda was expressing this condition because it was her own story.  All I could do was express my sympathy for a woman in this situation, whether it was her own or not.  I told her I understood her concern – it’s a real one.  Students who get pregnant do not just have to put up with expenses for a year.  They become permanent mothers.  They either need to raise this child, love it, and provide for it, or give it up for adoption.  It’s so, so hard for these women on our campus who find themselves pregnant when they did not intend to.  Amanda was moved and said, “Yeah, I think adoption is an alternative.  People try to say that it’s worse but I think it is a great idea.  After all, a lot of couples want a baby.”

I agreed with her and told her there is even a waiting list for couples wanting to adopt.  Then I said, “Going back to your concern about women who get pregnant while in poverty.  Let me ask you something…”  I trotted out the toddler as we had practiced in the training on Sunday, and finished with, “So I know it’s an extreme example, but you wouldn’t say we could kill that toddler, right?”  She said, “Of course not,” and then paused and added, “I understand what you mean.”

Her voice got a bit more anxious when she said, “I don’t know, it’s just that this whole time I have been telling myself that I was pro-choice, but after seeing that picture…”  She was referring to the picture of the aborted baby on one of the panels of the exhibit.  “Is that really ten weeks?”  I said yes, and she said, “I had no idea.”

Working with Justice For All bolstered our club in our fight against abortion, and helped spread awareness of our club. I highly recommend it for every single pro-life group on college campuses.
— Meredith

I told her that the reality behind that picture is the reason why I am fighting to end abortion.  I asked her if she agreed that a procedure so brutal could never be the right option, and so it should not be legal to choose it.  She said yes, but asked, “But if abortion were illegal, would that mean women who get abortions would be criminalized?  Would you agree with that?”  I might have faltered at this point, except that one of the JFA trainers had walked us through this topic at the training.  If I truly believe abortion is killing an innocent human being, which I do, then of course a woman who willingly breaks a law that states abortion is an illegal act of murder should be penalized.  I told her that it may be the case that a woman who committed an abortion was under a lot of emotional stress, and so may receive less grave sentences, but she would still need to be penalized.  She agreed with my reasoning.  She said, “Thank you so much for talking to me about this.  This really helped me.”  I gave Amanda the JFA brochure, and we exchanged numbers.  [Editor’s note: See JFA's Extending Your Learning page for more on this topic.]

Not every conversation goes this well, but JFA gives us the tools so that every conversation is at least civil and intelligent, and almost all of them leave the other person pondering.  The conversations definitely confirm me in my beliefs; at the same time, talking face-to-face with another student who holds the opposite opinion to mine helps me to be more understanding.  It reminds me of the reason why I believe abortion should be illegal: every person, whether it is the pro-choice student who is standing in front of me, or the unborn baby in a mother’s womb, has dignity and ought to be loved. 

Working with Justice For All bolstered our club in our fight against abortion, and helped spread awareness of our club.  I highly recommend it for every single pro-life group on college campuses.

- Meredith Boles, Member of Live Action UCLA and JFA Volunteer



By Catherine Wurts

March 2012

She made a beeline for our table, knelt down, and drew her line directly below the conception photo, signifying her view that human rights begin at that point.  Later that day, she helped save a child from abortion.

This is how it happened.

Amanda kneels to make her mark signifying that she thinks human rights begin at fertilization.

Amanda kneels to make her mark signifying that she thinks human rights begin at fertilization.

After Amanda stopped to give her opinion during a Justice For All outreach at Wichita State University (WSU), I asked her why she drew her line at conception and whether or not she ever gets into conversations with people who disagree with her.

Amanda said that as a Christian she knew abortion was wrong but wished she knew how to make a strong case for the pro-life position to her non-religious friends.

Catherine and Amanda talk near the JFA Kiosk.

Catherine and Amanda talk near the JFA Kiosk.

She was eager to learn, so over the course of the next 20 minutes, I gave her a crash-course version of the Abortion: From Debate to Dialogue seminar.  The conversation was very animated, and Amanda was a quick learner.

As we talked, Amanda became pensive and shared that earlier that week her friend at work, “Kim,” had told her she was planning to get an abortion.  Amanda realized the situation was urgent because Kim is only 19, has already had one abortion, is raising two small children, and has an unstable relationship with her boyfriend.

Amanda believes that God brought JFA to her campus as an answer to her prayer.

Kim is not a Christian, so Amanda didn’t think it would help to use the Bible to talk her out of abortion.  During the two days prior to the outreach at WSU, Amanda had been praying for God to somehow give her the words she would need to boldly reach out to Kim with love.  Amanda said she believed God had brought JFA to her campus that day as an answer to her prayer.

Catherine (right) prays with Amanda.

Catherine (right) prays with Amanda.

I then gave Amanda a copy of the JFA Exhibit Brochure and showed her how to give Kim a two-minute summary.  We also discussed Choices Medical Clinic, which provides local resources for women who are considering abortion.  I helped Amanda brainstorm how to broach the topic with Kim naturally.  We prayed together, hugged, and traded contact information before Amanda had to leave for work.

That afternoon, Amanda gave Kim a ride to work, stopping for coffee along the way.  She told Kim that some people had come to her campus to talk about abortion and that she thought Kim ought to look at the information they were handing out.

Amanda prayed silently and handed Kim the JFA Exhibit Brochure, saying, “I know you’ve had an abortion before, so some of these pictures will be difficult for you to see.  But I think it’s important that you look at all of the information in here while you’re deciding what to do.  And I want you to know I’m here for you.”

The very next day, Kim called Amanda to say that looking through the brochure had caused her to think about everything in a new way.  Amanda asked what she meant, and Kim said, “It made me realize that getting an abortion would be worse for my baby than the bad situation I’m in with my boyfriend.”  Kim said she had decided against having an abortion!

[JFA’s brochure] made me realize that getting an abortion would be worse for my baby than the bad situation I’m in with my boyfriend.
— Kim

Kim has since visited Choices Medical Clinic for a free sonogram, counseling, and other care. She and her two children have moved in with her mom.  She also has a new, better-paying job, and her baby is due to be born this August.

Please pray for Kim and her children, and please pray for Amanda as she continues to reach out to her friend with truth and love.  Amanda says she wants to go through our entire training program and to be more active with JFA in the near future.

Note: There’s more to this story.  Keep reading.


God Was at Work in the lives of Amanda and Kim

"Extras": More Details from Catherine's original March/April 2012 Letter from which the above report was drawn ("On-The-Spot Training Helps Save a Life")

We thank God for orchestrating these events and working through Amanda to pursue Kim and her precious child.  Consider these additional details of the story:

  • For years Amanda had felt God calling her to do something about abortion, but didn’t know what to do.
  • Amanda and Kim have such different lifestyles that people at their work have wondered aloud why they get along so well. Amanda is convinced it is all by God’s grace, according to His plan.  
  • Our JFA team would not normally have had an outreach at WSU in January. The only reason we were there that week was to test out the new kiosk before taking it all the way to Arizona at the end of the month.
  • There's another reason we might never have met Amanda; she was only going to stop at the kiosk for a few minutes between classes. But the class she was heading to got canceled, so she had time to stay and get trained!
  • After talking with Amanda, Kim called the JFA office the following week on a day that I don’t usually answer the phones, but I happened to pick up.  She had already decided to keep her child, but she seemed stressed.  I felt privileged to be able to listen, process with her, and arrange a three-way call with one of the counselors at Choice Medical Clinic. 


April 2012

Today I had the privilege of seeing a sonogram of the child whose life was spared by God working through me, and as I watched her wiggle around on the screen, we found out she is a precious baby girl :)
— Text Message from Amanda (April 19, 2012)


November 2012: One (Tiny) Person at a Time

A Note from Catherine Wurts


Dear Family and Friends,

This spring I wrote to you about Amanda, who I met on her campus in January.  Later that day, she shared our brochure with her friend, "Kim," who had already had one abortion and was planning to get a second one.

Kim said that the JFA brochure helped her realize “that getting an abortion would be worse for my baby than the bad situation I’m in with my boyfriend.”

Amanda and I were privileged to attend Kim’s baby shower on my birthday (best birthday present ever), and we got the news in August that her baby girl was born!

When this picture was taken, Amanda was so happy to be able to meet Lucy for the first time!

When this picture was taken, Amanda was so happy to be able to meet Lucy for the first time!

Kim and Amanda continue to keep in touch.  Earlier this month, Amanda sent me the beautiful photo above with the message, “I’m hoping to meet her soon!”  And last week, she sent me the photo below of herself holding Kim’s baby girl with the message, “Finally met her!”

I am so grateful to God for the grace and courage he has given these two young women, and for the life of this beautiful baby girl.  Thank you for partnering with me in this mission.  Together we are making abortion unthinkable, one person at a time.

In Christ, 

Catherine Wurts


December 2013: You Helped Save This Girl's Life!

A Note from Catherine Wurts

Dear Family and Friends,

Last year I shared a story with you about meeting Amanda the day after her friend, “Kim,” told her she was planning to get an abortion.

After we spoke, Amanda shared the JFA brochure with Kim, and it changed her mind.  In Kim’s words, “It made me realize that getting an abortion would be worse for my child than the bad situation I’m in with my boyfriend.”

Kim’s baby girl “Lucy” was born last August!

Amanda holds "Lucy," now one year old.

Amanda holds "Lucy," now one year old.

Amanda continues to be a positive presence in Kim and Lucy’s lives.  Last month I got a text message from Amanda.  I opened it to find the photo you see nearby, along with the following caption: “The first time I saw my precious jewel since she turned 1.”  I just had to share this update with you!

We have heard of quite a number of lives that have been saved as a result of pro-life people lovingly sharing our little nine-inch JFA brochure with abortion-minded women.  If you would like copies of our brochure so you can be prepared to help a woman in the same way, please [request them here].  I would also be glad to share with you ideas of how to bring up the conversation and how to share the information in the brochure in a loving way, just like I did with Amanda that day.

Thank you for your support of my work at JFA.  Whether you send prayers or financial gifts or both, your partnership allows me the great privilege of being here, living out our mission of training thousands to make abortion unthinkable for millions, one person at a time.

In Christ,

Catherine Wurts

June 2016 Impact Report

CK Wisner, Training Specialist

Part I: September 2015

Things were getting out of hand.  Voices were raised and the crowd was visibly upset.  Gathered in front of Justice For All’s display at the University of Georgia – Athens (UGA) were several pro-life men, most notably Matthew and Isaac, engaging one pro-choice woman, “Jamie.”  I joined the debate hoping to turn it into a gracious dialogue. 

I started by addressing a question to Matthew.  As I was beginning to understand Matthew's point of view on abortion, Jamie interrupted him.  Soon after Jamie started talking, Isaac interrupted her.  We weren’t getting any closer to having a productive conversation, so I laid some ground rules.

Me: Excuse me, but I don’t feel like we’re getting anywhere with this discussion.  I propose that we take time to listen to each other and try to understand where everyone is coming from.  If someone else is speaking and you have something you’d like to say, please raise your hand and that will signify that you get to speak next.  Now, I hold to “ladies first,” so I’m going to let Jamie speak next.

Jamie: Well, I think that women are just in really difficult situations.  We don’t know what any given woman is going through or why she needs an abortion…

Matthew and Isaac: But wait!  There’s a baby in that situation…

At this point, Jamie was looking very angry.  Trying to avoid further outbursts, I decided to help the pro-lifers out a little bit by teaching them the concept of common ground.

Me: [raising my hand] Hey guys, I think Jamie is actually saying something about which we can all agree…if I understood her correctly, she is concerned about women who are facing really difficult situations.  I think we all are concerned for women in difficult circumstances.  Is that right?

Matthew and Isaac: Yes.  Definitely!

Me: I’m glad we agree on that.  I find that making note of the things we agree on is particularly helpful.

The dynamic of the conversation then changed.  Prior to introducing the concepts of listening and finding common ground, students were yelling their views and grouped together like a mob.  After adding structure and kindness, the group formed into a circle, and all of us started respectfully raising our hands when we had something to say.

Even though things were going well, I was becoming concerned for Jamie.  She was still highly emotional, and when I would aim to lovingly point out the flaws of her pro-choice position, she would admit that I was right, but then still cling with a passion to her views.  I could sense that something was underneath the surface that she was not sharing.

The conversation carried on for about 45 more minutes.  I heard the views of those who had joined our conversation.  Eventually it was obvious that everyone had said what he or she had to say.  As people were starting to repeat themselves, I raised my hand again.

Me: I’ve appreciated all of you sharing your views.  Can I see a show of hands on who understands what Matthew believes?

All hands rose.

Me: Who understands what Jamie believes?

All hands rose for a second time.  I continued asking this question about every person who had shared his view, and each time there was a complete consensus that everyone was at least beginning to understand what the others believed.  I then kindly ended the conversation.

Me: Now that we understand each other, I think it would be more productive to end the group discussion here, instead of each of us repeating our stances on abortion.  I think no one at this point is open to changing his or her mind in front of a group.  I’m more than happy to talk to each of you one-on-one.

The group disbanded, and I took this opportunity to pull Jamie aside.  I shared with her that I appreciated her sharing her view when nearly everyone had disagreed with her.  She thanked me, but she was still noticeably hurting.  I was becoming more and more convinced that Jamie had a personal connection with abortion.

Me: Do you know anyone who has had an abortion?

With that question, Jamie fell into my arms weeping.  I held her until she gained her composure.  Jamie then confirmed that she herself had an abortion in her past.

Jamie: [pointing at a photo of the aftermath of abortion] That photo condemns me to hell.

Me: Jamie, abortion is not the unforgiveable sin.  Jesus is just as willing and able to forgive the sin of abortion as He would be any other sin.  There is grace and healing in Jesus.  I’m not trying to take away your guilt [because I did believe what Jamie did was wrong], but I want you to know that redemption for your past mistakes is completely open to you.

Jamie: I just don’t know why I feel this way, because I don’t think abortion is wrong.

I just don’t know why I feel this way, because I don’t think abortion is wrong.
— Jamie

Me: [very gently] You don’t have to answer this question out loud, but I want to give you something to think about.  Are you sure abortion isn’t wrong, or are you just telling yourself that to justify your actions?

At this Jamie simply nodded her head.  We talked for a few more minutes, and I made sure to get her contact information so that I could connect her with resources for healing from her abortion.  Once I got back from Georgia, I did email Jamie.  Her message back to me showed me why I do this work with Justice For All.  She said,

“Thank you for this.  I have been thinking a lot since we met, and I want you to know that that has been good for me.  I've actually discussed the matter with my parents for the first time in several years, and it was a healing occasion for all of us.  Thank you for your help.”

When I returned to UGA in February of this year (2016), I had another conversation with Jamie.  (Continue reading below.)  I am confident that God continues to be at work.  He is at work in Jamie’s life, my life, and your life.  Let’s pray for Jamie to draw near to Christ that she might fully experience Christ’s healing work in her life. 

The JFA Exhibit (2000) panels displayed at UGA on the day CK met Jamie.  Jamie was referring to the "Is this humane?" panel when she said, "That photo condemns me to hell," and CK was able to share the message of Christ's forgiveness with her.

The JFA Exhibit (2000) panels displayed at UGA on the day CK met Jamie.  Jamie was referring to the "Is this humane?" panel when she said, "That photo condemns me to hell," and CK was able to share the message of Christ's forgiveness with her.

Note: Part I originally appeared in CK's December 2015 Newsletter.


Part II: February 2016

In my December 2015 newsletter, I shared with you one of my favorite stories about a dear young woman, “Jamie.” I told you about meeting Jamie at an outreach event and shared how she had opened up to me about the abortion in her past. I was able to love Jamie in the midst of the short time I had with her and share with her the hope of healing. We then exchanged a couple of emails.

But the story doesn’t end there. I returned to Jamie’s campus in February of this year. I knew that I wanted to see her again, so I sent her an email letting her know that I was going to be there. Early Monday morning on the first day of our outreach event she came by. We greeted each other with a hug of friendship and then I asked her how she had been doing. For the next several minutes, I heard more of her story. The details were heartbreaking.

After I had listened to Jamie, she said something that surprised me: “I’m the closest I’ve ever been to being pro-life, but I just have a couple of questions.” I asked Jamie to share with me what her questions were, and together we began to address them. By the end of our conversation, she recognized the truth of my answers, but understandably she still needed to think about it. I didn’t expect her to change her mind right then and there because she has been pro-choice her whole life. If I had believed something my whole life, I would need time to process a big shift in thinking, too.

Jamie came back by our outreach event the next day as well, but just to give me a hug. I had written her a letter after we had talked the day before and I was able to give it to her. In the letter, I shared with her that she is beautiful and also shared with her about the love of Jesus. I am continuing to pray for her to see the Truth. I count Jamie as a dear friend and my heart longs for her to find complete healing in Jesus. In the brief time we’ve been able to spend time together, God has used her to encourage me and to grow in me a heart to continue loving the hurting.

Stories like Jamie’s remind me why I work at Justice For All. They show me how deep the need is to reach the hurting and the great opportunity I have to share hope with them. Here is an awesome reality: God is able to work through you to love those He has placed in your life, too. If you need a little help getting started and you have not been through JFA’s training program, I strongly suggest that you attend. It has not only laid the foundation for me to communicate with those who believe differently than me regarding the value of human life, but it has also helped me learn how to communicate in general.

Thank you for your prayers, financial support, and encouragement. God is working through you to enable our team at JFA to meet more people like Jamie.

Note: Part II originally appeared in CK's May 2016 newsletter.


A woman walked up to me years ago at a JFA large exhibit event at University of Colorado (Boulder).  She was crying and could hardly speak, but she said something about our exhibit and her abortion.  As I attempted to show concern for her, she turned and walked away.  While I think that abortion images do a great deal of good when shown in public and that this woman’s grief might very well have been precisely what she needed to begin to grapple with her abortion, my heart breaks for this woman and others who for whatever reason weren’t able to find healing during their encounter with the JFA team.

Thankfully, some women who have had abortions are able to begin to embrace healing at Justice For All outreach events, even when abortion images are shown publicly.  In the story of CK Wisner and Jamie (above), we see through CK's beautiful example how a compassionate, gentle, and skillful ambassador for Christ can play a vital role in a person’s process of healing from a past abortion.   

- Steve Wagner, Executive Director

By Rebecca Haschke, Training Specialist (November 2015)
Introduction: In election seasons, it is very common for people to talk about what the law should be on abortion.  When that is the topic, it is also very common to hear some version of the following sentiment: “I’m pro-life, but I can’t tell other people what to do.  Therefore, abortion should be legal.”  JFA trainer Rebecca Haschke did a beautiful job of helping a young man reconsider this sentiment in a conversation she described in a recent letter entitled “#Mindblown” (below).  In this man’s case, he felt that because he had religious reasons for his point of view on abortion, he was disqualified from making a case that abortion should not be legal.  I think you’ll be encouraged to see how this young man came to see things differently in just minutes.  In the process, you’ll witness Rebecca’s manner, and you’ll learn a sequence of questions you can ask when you confront this sort of concern in conversations with friends and neighbors. - Steve Wagner, Executive Director
Rebecca Haschke interacts with a student at the University of Georgia at Athens in September 2015.

Rebecca Haschke interacts with a student at the University of Georgia at Athens in September 2015.

“Brian” confidently stated he was pro-life.  I had just met Brian at the University of Georgia-Athens and asked him, “Brian, what does that mean for you?  Do you think abortion should be illegal?”  He responded, “No, we can’t force our beliefs on others.  I’m pro-life because I’m a Christian, but legally enforcing my stance on abortion would push my religion on people who don’t believe the same as me.”

I shared the above short story earlier this year in my March newsletter, "Give Thanks In All Circumstances."  Brian’s response is not an unusual one.  I’ve heard it many times.  Hearing it as often as I do can be discouraging, which is why I took the time in March to reflect on the need to give thanks in all circumstances, not just the circumstances that seem uplifting and enjoyable.

However, this conversation with Brian that I shared in March didn’t end there.  It continued and went something like this:


Becca (me): Brian, you mentioned that it is because you are a Christian that you are pro-life.  Do your Christian beliefs give you reasons for thinking that abortion is wrong?

Brian: Of course.  Human life is sacred.  God created those human lives, they are valuable, and we should not kill them.

Becca: I agree with those statements.  From what you just said it seems that you may believe the unborn are human beings biologically.  Is that true?

Brian: Yeah, absolutely.

Becca: Human beings like you and me?

Brian: Yes.

Becca: When do you believe that the unborn become biological human beings like you and me?

Brian: [He walked up to the Justice For All Exhibit and pointed at a picture of fertilization.] From the very beginning.  Conception.

Becca: Okay.  Brian, can you explain to me why you think that you would be pushing your religious beliefs on others if you supported laws that would protect unborn human beings from being killed through abortion?

Brian: Well, women have a lot of difficult choices that they have to make in their lives.  Choice is an important thing.  If we make a law against abortion, we are taking away their right to that choice.  That’s like pushing my views on them.  They no longer would have the right to choose.

Becca: That’s true.  The choice to kill their children in utero would no longer be granted to women.  I’m curious.  Do you think that it is ever right for the government to make a law that takes away a “choice”?

Brian: Uh…no?

Becca: Well, do you agree that the laws that make it illegal to walk onto this campus and kill college students are good laws?

Brian: Of course.

Becca: I agree.  However, when enforcing that law, the government is taking away particular choices of other people.  What about laws prohibiting beating children in the privacy of your own home?  Are those good laws?

Brian: Yes, yes.  Those are good laws.

Becca: What if it is just your religion that makes you think that it is wrong to beat children?  Should you have the right to impose and force your religious beliefs on me?

Brian: Yes, because those laws protect others from being harmed.  That’s not just a religious belief.  It is a law protecting human rights.

Becca: So we can agree that laws which restrict “choice” in order to protect human lives are good, despite the fact that your support of those laws might be based on religious beliefs?  It’s possible that our religious beliefs may guide us to the same conclusion as those who don’t share those beliefs—the conclusion that all human lives should be protected.  That wouldn’t be forcing our religion on others, but simply protecting human rights.  Can we agree on that?

Brian: Yes, we can.

Becca: If it is important for us to protect human life and if the unborn are just as human and valuable as you and me, shouldn’t they also be granted that same protection under the law?

Brian: Wow.  Yeah, I guess.  I just have always thought that would be imposing my beliefs on others.

Becca: [I then pointed to pictures in the JFA Exhibit Brochure depicting various genocides throughout history.]  Brian, do you think that people who were not victims of the injustices shown in these pictures had an obligation to stand up for those who were being killed?

Brian: Yes.

Becca: I’m going to make a proposal.  Brian, not only is it right for you to believe that abortion should be illegal because it takes the life of a human being; but actually—as a person who has the knowledge that 1) the unborn is a human being and 2) over a million are killed each year in the country in which you reside—you have an obligation to speak up for those humans who are being killed.

(silent pause)

Brian: #MindBlown [hashtag: Mind Blown].


It was as if he had finally been given permission to defend the lives of innocent human beings that he understood were valuable, permission to voice his opinion without shame. Relief and amazement radiated from his eyes.

Brian’s final response took me by surprise.  From the start of our conversation he seemed so confident in his belief that it is wrong to enforce laws telling others what they can and cannot do.  Until that final moment in our conversation, the questions I had asked him did not seem to be creating any change of mind or heart.  When he looked at me and said, “#MindBlown,” his entire demeanor changed.  It was as if he had finally been given permission to defend the lives of innocent human beings that he understood were valuable, permission to voice his opinion without shame.  Relief and amazement radiated from his eyes.

The culture in which we live is permeated with the belief and mantra that we cannot tell others what to do.  Thank you for your support that not only helps us challenge the beliefs of those who do not think the unborn are valuable human beings, but also helps us encourage the students who recognize the unborn are valuable, but do not feel they have the right to share that belief with others.

Note: Members of JFA’s training team interacted with the topic of Rebecca’s letter recently.  You can read some of their reflections and post your own at the JFA blog.


Impact Report: March 2016

by Jeremy Gorr, For the JFA Team

Like so many of us, Andrew did not often have conversations about abortion.  He was pro-life, but he lacked confidence.  Then he participated in the Justice For All (JFA) training program last fall.  His college pastor, Chris Haynes, and their church, Trinity Baptist Church in Norman, Oklahoma, have a very purposeful emphasis on “the equipping of the saints for the work of service” (Eph. 4:12), so this was one of many times that they have invited JFA to help train their students.  Later, Andrew said,

Before the JFA conference, I was hesitant to raise the topic of abortion with my peers.  While this was due mainly to my lack of knowledge about abortion, I also felt uncomfortable raising the subject due to my lack of experience in conversing about the topic with someone from another worldview.

Before the JFA conference, I was hesitant to raise the topic of abortion with my peers.  — Andrew (right)

Before the JFA conference, I was hesitant to raise the topic of abortion with my peers.  — Andrew (right)

I’ve heard these same hesitations often.  Many people say that there is no way the average person is capable of engaging in productive dialogue with pro-choice advocates.  Andrew’s JFA experience proved the opposite.  JFA training helped Andrew develop (1) confidence in his own pro-life convictions, (2) confidence to begin creating dialogue, and (3) confidence to create further conversations in his daily life.

The first dose of confidence came for Andrew during the interactive seminar (Seat Work) portion of the training program.  In a mentor group led by Rebecca Haschke and me, Andrew and other students said they felt apprehensive about coming to our outreach event at the University of Oklahoma (OU) the following week.  As these students learned why common pro-choice arguments fail and practiced sharing the evidence which supports the pro-life position, however, their confidence grew.  Andrew reflected,

JFA not only has given me the tools I need to reach out to my peers, but also has helped me firm up my position on abortion as well as my reasoning behind my stance.

Even with this confidence, though, Andrew wondered if he personally could take these ideas and produce a good conversation with them.  Here’s how our outreach event at OU (Feet Work) enabled him to do just that.  At the beginning of the outreach event, Andrew got a second dose of confidence as he listened in to conversations that JFA staff members were having with pro-choice students.  The next day, he took the critical step of starting not just one, but many conversations.  He was surprised by what he learned:

During the time I spent in outreach with JFA, I had several opportunities to dialogue with other college students about their beliefs about abortion.  Through these interactions, I learned not to categorize someone too quickly.  To my surprise, many people who initially stated that they supported abortion were less supportive after receiving information.  Most of the people I spoke to were not the die-hard leftists I had thought they would be.  On the other hand, several people who thought abortion should be illegal turned out to support early abortions!  Through outreach with JFA, I discovered that you really don’t know where someone stands on an issue until you ask specific questions.

Through these interactions, I learned not to categorize someone too quickly… you really don't know where someone stands on an issue until you ask specific questions.  — Andrew (left)

Through these interactions, I learned not to categorize someone too quickly… you really don't know where someone stands on an issue until you ask specific questions.  — Andrew (left)

Andrew gained an understanding of pro-choice advocates and of himself through outreach that he could not have gained otherwise.  That’s why JFA has found Seat Work and Feet Work to be such a powerful combination.  Seat Work provides the tools for creating good conversations, but Feet Work gives a real-life opportunity to practice using those tools, to get rid of false caricatures of the people we’re trying to reach, and to explore ways to grow in dialogue skills.    

Andrew found that creating conversations during Feet Work gave him a third dose of confidence so that it was natural for him to continue creating dialogue about abortion after the JFA events (Repeat Work):

The [seminar] and outreach JFA allowed me to take part in have prepared me for several discussions since their visit to campus.  In dialogues with fellow students, finding common ground has been very important as have techniques such as “trotting out the toddler.”  I am thankful for the opportunity I had to volunteer with JFA and to develop my convictions and my ability to share them.

Andrew initially had the same hesitance to have conversations that most people have.  His biggest hurdle was his first conversation.  Once that hurdle was past, creating more conversations did not seem so daunting.  Andrew’s story demonstrates that gaining knowledge at a JFA seminar and taking a first dialogue step at a JFA outreach event can produce bold action on behalf of the unborn.

The [seminar] and outreach JFA allowed me to take part in have prepared me for several discussions since their visit to campus.
— Andrew

Are you someone who wants to be prepared for these kinds of conversations, but you’re hesitant like Andrew was?  Do you know someone in the same boat?  You can gain confidence like Andrew did by participating in JFA’s training program, including a Feet Work event.  You can find upcoming opportunities on the JFA Event Calendar.  Or, inquire about JFA Mission Trip opportunities.

We thank God that he used Justice For All, in partnership with Andrew’s very supportive college pastor and church, to help Andrew gain the confidence to be able to regularly and graciously share his views about abortion with his peers.  Thank you for supporting the mission of JFA so that we can offer Seat Work and Feet Work experiences to others who simply lack the confidence to start the conversation.  Through thousands of bold advocates like Andrew, we can truly make abortion unthinkable for millions – one conversation at a time.

- Jeremy Gorr, for the JFA Team

Impact Report: November 2015

by Joanna Wagner, Training Specialist

I looked into a crowd of 200 faces on October 1, as I prepared to deliver a chapel presentation to grades 7-12 at Christian Heritage Academy (CHA) in Oklahoma.  In the eight years since I was a high school student sitting in a similar high school auditorium, I've talked with many friends and acquaintances facing unplanned pregnancies or struggling with past abortion decisions.  I hoped that this morning I could inspire these teens to get equipped for similar interactions, knowing that they might make the difference for the little ones whose lives will be in the balance in their friends' wombs all too soon. 

Keawe shares the JFA Brochure during outreach events at the University of North Texas in 2014 (above) and the University of Oklahoma in 2015 (below).

Keawe shares the JFA Brochure during outreach events at the University of North Texas in 2014 (above) and the University of Oklahoma in 2015 (below).

I was aware of the stakes, but because of the outstanding partnership we’ve had with CHA over the years, I was also aware of how much potential was present in the room.  CHA alumnus Keawe Bridges is a good example.  During his final JFA outreach event as a CHA student recently, he shared this story:

[When] I arrived at the University of Oklahoma (OU) campus…I was expecting to talk to a lot of pro-choice people right off the bat.  I was all geared up and ready to play defense against any argument the pro-choice advocates could throw at me – and then the very first person I talked to was a pro-life advocate.  Even though it wasn’t what I had been expecting, it was good to know there were pro-life advocates on campus.
Then I remembered that the JFA staff had told us not to let people off the hook, so to speak, just because they said they were pro-life, as many people who claim to be pro-life still have doubts or consent to abortion in some cases.  As a pro-life advocate myself who, before JFA training, couldn’t present a decent rebuttal to any of the pro-choice arguments, I figured that I could impart some of my newfound knowledge to this fellow pro-life advocate.  I started by telling him that I was a pro-life advocate as well, but that I wanted to test him by acting like a pro-choice advocate by using some of their arguments.  Just as they had me, the arguments stumped him…  I was then able to step outside that role of being the pro-choice advocate and explain to the college student how to dismantle the pro-choice arguments – which is how I had been taught [by JFA].  Thus I was not only able to have discussions with pro-choice advocates about abortion, but I was also able to teach pro-life advocates how to defend against [pro-choice] arguments…thanks to the JFA training I received!
JFA training staff made 65 presentations to 4,313 people in 2015.

Keawe’s confidence to teach others what he had learned didn’t come out of nowhere.  Keawe was part of an incredible community of Christians who were pouring into his life, including his parents and the faculty at CHA.  In his freshman year at CHA, a JFA presentation helped convict him about the importance of being a voice for the unborn.  As a member of CHA’s Salt and Light Student Leadership Program, he participated in our mentor-guided Seat Work and Feet Work events, practicing the art of creating conversations that change minds.  Most importantly, because of his repeated involvement, he gained the confidence to start training other pro-life advocates! 

251 volunteers participated in a JFA “Feet Work” outreach event for the first time in 2015.

Not only did Keawe give this pro-life OU student ways to respond to pro-choice concerns, he even went a step further and began to step into the pro-choice role so that the pro-life student could get a chance to practice the conversation.  Interactive practice is vital to JFA’s educational philosophy, and Keawe had caught the vision. 

He caught that vision so well, in fact, that the next day he was even able to help a few of his classmates to begin putting their thoughts into words when they were stumped in a conversation.  Instead of jumping in and taking the conversation over for them, he helped them stay in the conversation and “learn by doing.”

CHA students and JFA staff members pause after a day of  outreach at the University of Oklahoma in March 2015. Keawe is in the first row, second from right.

CHA students and JFA staff members pause after a day of  outreach at the University of Oklahoma in March 2015. Keawe is in the first row, second from right.

Two of my high school colleagues decided…to try the survey approach.  One of the two was a bit shyer and had less experience, so I accompanied them just to help out in case they ran into any confusing conversations.  At first I just sat on a nearby bench to watch…  Once they had reached the end of the survey [with one woman], the two administering it hit a bit of a snag as they seemed unsure how to continue the conversation. 
Seeing the unscheduled dramatic pause, I gingerly got up off the bench and walked over to join the conversation…  Since I had been listening to the answers the woman had given during the survey, I readdressed one of the situations in which she had said she would be okay with abortion; however I didn’t correct her…  [Instead, I presented] her ideas in ways that my peers were able to recognize [those ideas] as common pro-choice arguments [so that my peers could offer a] rebuttal.  By the end of the conversation, we were able to clear up any confusion the woman had had, and she agreed with us on all points.

When Keawe shared these stories, I was astonished by his ability to converse with pro-choice advocates, but I was even more astonished by how he had caught the vision for training others.  This should not have surprised me, though, since JFA had given me the very same gift when I was Keawe’s age.  JFA training was what originally equipped me for dialogue, gave me opportunities to practice good conversations, and inspired me to take on the responsibility of training others.  It’s simply what JFA does.

JFA conducted 36 days of outreach on 15 college campuses in 2015.

This year, JFA trainers started this process with 4,313 people at 65 presentations and workshops, by convicting the hearts of young and old alike about the inhumanity of abortion and the need to create a different kind of conversation about abortion.  We took that a step further with 728 participants at 32 seminars, equipping them for dialogue through hours of teaching and interactive practice.  Finally, 251 people took the critical step of creating dialogue with pro-choice advocates at a JFA campus outreach event for the first time, and this prepared them to create conversations in their own spheres of influence.  It’s a joy to see that for Keawe the process came full circle as he began equipping others to make abortion unthinkable. 

- Joanna Wagner, for the JFA Team




JFA is the best thing we do as a school.
— Aaron Ferguson, Director of Salt and Light at Christian Heritage Academy

Keawe’s inclination to take what he had learned from JFA and help other pro-life advocates tells us something about his personality and his upbringing, but it also tells us about the encouragement and training he received through the Salt and Light program at his high school, Christian Heritage Academy (CHA).  The Salt and Light team endeavors to “train American Christian leaders for every sphere of society,” and we’ve been privileged to partner with CHA and its Salt and Light program since 2007.  Salt and Light Director Aaron Ferguson has said, “JFA is the best thing we do as a school.”  We’re gratified to hear that, because we think partnering with the CHA community to train world-changers like Keawe is one of the best things we do!

- Steve Wagner, Executive Director

Reflection on the Justice For All Boulder Outreach
Focus on the Family Institute, September 2003
By Ashley* 

I remember the bus ride up to Boulder, talking, laughing with my friends.  All the while, in some of the deepest parts of me, I felt some very familiar emotions being pulled.  Babies, unwanted pregnancies, abortion, embarrassment . . . I began to remember them all.   

I know some of the students I was with were a little nervous.  They didn’t have any experience with this stuff and were afraid they didn’t have much wisdom to offer others.  In a way it’s sort of true.  Unless you have been there . . . unless you know what it feels like to be single, pregnant, in an abusive relationship, maybe even disowned by your family . . . it’s hard to say what you would do.  I wish I had been in the same boat with my friends, but I wasn’t.  I’d been there; I remember what it felt like. 

I believe in divine appointments . . . the kind that you know only God could have set up for an exact 15 minutes of your whole life.

No one will know unless I tell them, I thought.  I never considered that God would use me. I was broken, embarrassed, and ashamed.  I was surrounded by 87 students who had more character and integrity than I had ever seen and I felt their strong, honorable lives were more valuable than my destructive past.

I knew we were all sinners, but my sin was different . . . you could see it.  Everyone else got to quietly discuss their issues with God, while mine was displayed for the whole world to see for nine months.  There’s a stigma that comes with unwed mothers, especially in the Christian community.  Sometimes I still wonder if my Christian friends see me as “Ash” or “Ash that had a baby.”

I was intrigued standing around the exhibit, listening to debates, arguments, and people just sharing so vulnerably with strangers that you know a lot about a person after only a few minutes.  Everyone was being real and a fire was starting inside me.  This issue was so close to my heart.

A year and a half earlier I found out I was pregnant with a guy that I should have never dated.  Not walking with the Lord, and all options on the table, I seriously considered abortion.  I remember when I made the appointment, I wanted it done as soon as possible and the woman on the phone told me that we had to wait six to eight weeks because the baby was so small right now that they wouldn’t be able to tell if they got it all out.

It was only a couple of days afterwards that I decided against the abortion.  It wasn’t a heroic gesture to save my baby’s life.  It wasn’t a good moral decision based on the idea that all life is sacred.  It just felt wrong to me.  Though I wasn’t walking with the Lord, the Holy Spirit was with me and wouldn’t let me go through with it.  I gave birth to my son on January 13, 2003, and gave him to an amazing adoptive family.

I believe in divine appointments . . . the kind that you know only God could have set up for an exact 15 minutes of your whole life.  I was surrounded by a crowd of people, all standing in silence looking up at the giant, horrific pictures.

In the background you could hear side conversations and debates, but they are all drowned out by a voice in your head, trying to comprehend these pictures.  Are they real?  This is so wrong.  These can’t be real.  You finally gain your composure after your breath is literally taken away, and you muster up something to say, maybe to yourself, maybe to the person next to you.

“I would have another sibling, but my mom had an abortion,” said the young man standing next to me.  His eyes didn’t move from the pictures.  I’m not sure who he was talking to, maybe anyone who would listen.

As I slowly turned my head to see the tall, thin man, with a baseball cap, and hands in his baggy jean pockets, I hear another person speak out.  This time, on my other side.  The man, not quite as young as the one on my left, had a beard and glasses.  He was holding his girlfriend’s hand.  “I participated in an abortion once.”  I nodded my head to acknowledge his words and looked down at the ground as I gently moved the grass under my foot.

After what seemed like an eternity, I looked up to make eye contact with him.  The girl on his arm had tears streaming down her face.  Before I had a chance to speak, she said, “I had an abortion once.”  I couldn’t hold it in a second longer – with no reservation I blurted out, “I had an appointment for an abortion once, but I ended up giving him up for adoption.”

The girl let go of her boyfriend’s hand, took a few steps, and collapsed in my arms, sobbing.  We held each other and cried, holding nothing back.  I sensed other bodies around us and then felt the arms of the two men who had also just shared their hearts with us.

There we were, four strangers in the middle of a college campus, surrounded by hundreds of people, brought together by the Creator of the Universe, to help heal each other’s pain.  After the heavy sobs stopped and we began to sniff and wipe our noses, I asked these three strangers if they wanted to pray.  None of them spoke, but they all nodded in agreement.  I took the girls hand, knowing the guys would follow, and led them away from the crowd, under a tree, where we stood in a circle, holding hands, praying to our Lord.

This experience wasn’t a highlight of my week, or even semester, but something I will treasure and remember for the rest of my life.

I have no idea what I said or prayed as we stood under that tree, because it wasn’t me speaking.  I spoke truth to them that day, and though I’ll never know how it was received or if I made a difference, I know how they impacted me.  As I watched them walk away in different directions, I felt a sense of peace and relief for what the Lord has saved me from.  I am forgiven and have been washed as white as snow.

This experience wasn’t a highlight of my week, or even semester, but something I will treasure and remember for the rest of my life. I realized that day that everyone was broken; I wasn’t alone. And despite our brokenness, God still wants to use us for His glory. What an awesome feeling – to be used by our King. He took my shameful past and used it for good.

“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.”  – Romans 8:28  

* Name changed.  Used by permission.

Conversations: September 2015

By Rebecca Haschke

Phase 1

Phase 1

Navigating a one-on-one conversation about a controversial subject can be difficult.  Now add nine more people with varying opinions.  Is it possible for the conversation to remain productive, or at least civil?  At our University of Arizona outreach in February 2015, I watched a one-on-one conversation transform into a conversation with a crowd that lasted three hours.

“Michael” (Phase 1) approached me in order to share his view that he didn’t believe life began at conception.  Overhearing the conversation, two other students wandered over to listen in (Phase 2).  Then two more students arrived and began peppering me with their opinions and thoughts, including multiple questions related to their disagreements regarding what they had heard me discuss with Michael.

At this point there was no way to answer every student’s questions at the same time (not to mention that every response I shared prompted more questions).   In order to respect Michael, and not forget him in the midst of this developing crowd, I asked a favor of all five students.  I said something like,

Phase 2

Phase 2

“You are all bringing up important topics and questions to cover.  I want to answer all of them, but I want to respect each of you by doing it in an orderly fashion so that we don’t miss anything.  Here are the concerns I have heard:

  • What about poverty?  What about women who don’t have the means to care for a child?
  • What about women who already have too many children?
  • What about a woman who has been violated (rape)?
  • Women’s liberty:  Doesn’t the pro-life view violate our liberties?
  • The unborn aren’t human so shouldn’t abortion only be illegal after we become human?
  • Men shouldn’t have an opinion in this matter.  It’s a woman’s body. So it’s her choice.

Phase 3

Phase 3

“I need your help though.  Please help me remember each of these questions if I forget one.  If you have another question, let me know so that we can add it to the list.  I am going to start by answering one of Michael’s questions first, the one about women who don’t seem to have the financial means to care for a child.”

In the next three hours I witnessed something beautiful unfold.  Because each of the students knew that I thought addressing each question was important, they patiently waited their turn. As more and more students wandered over to listen in (with most of them eventually joining in) each one witnessed a particular type of conversation taking place:  It was a conversation in which disagreement was readily present but anger was absent.  People were asking questions to seek clarification.  People were actively listening to understand each other.  People where not interrupting each other.

This respectful conversation set a precedent, and this precedent caused a second beautiful response from the students.  Newcomers recognized the calm demeanor of those who disagreed with me and quickly followed suit.  So much so, that they would even raise their hands (see Phase 3 above) and wait for me to call on them before sharing thoughts or asking questions.

It was a conversation in which disagreement was readily present but anger was absent.

At one point in the conversation I was able to ask the students present how they felt after the past hour of conversation.  One of the students had changed his mind about when we are biologically human.  Another student felt that abortion should still be legal but not in as many cases as she had originally thought.  A third student commented that, although she was still pro-choice, she had never heard these pro-life arguments and they made sense.  Later that day a fourth student returned to tell me that although he is pro-life he had never witnessed a conversation about abortion like that one.  He was amazed by the response of the students.

One pro-choice student who joined the group conversation had spent two hours in conversation with me the day prior.  During the group discussion he responded to several of the pro-choice arguments using the same pro-life responses I had shared with him the day before.  Although he stated he was still pro-choice, it was clear that he now also saw the validity in some of the arguments I had proposed to him.

Thank you for helping JFA turn the debate about abortion into a productive dialogue by respecting the dignity of the unborn while also respecting the dignity of each person in the conversation.

Impact Report: August 2015

CK’s story took place near this series of poll tables on UCLA’s Bruin Walk.

CK’s story took place near this series of poll tables on UCLA’s Bruin Walk.

I almost didn’t talk to her.  It was the morning of the second day of our outreach event at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).  “Jenny” was standing across the walkway, and I was uncertain if she had seen our “Should Abortion Remain Legal?” poll table question.  She appeared to be lost in thought, and I didn’t want to be a bother to her.  I immediately began an internal argument with myself about all of the reasons why I shouldn’t talk with her.

The longer Jenny stood there, the more I felt like I should ignore my fear of interrupting her day.  I approached her and asked if she had an opinion on our question.  At first she seemed hesitant to talk to me, but as the conversation continued, I learned that Jenny did have an opinion.  She believed that if a child was going to be born into poverty that abortion would be justified.  I listened to her concern and acknowledged that growing up in poverty would be extremely challenging.  In response to her concern, I used a conversational tool that we teach at Justice For All (JFA) called “Trot Out the Toddler” (TOTT)* to help refocus the conversation on the central question, “What is the unborn?”  After discussing the humanity of the unborn, Jenny agreed that abortion was wrong in most cases, but she still had one very serious concern.

Marcos Espinoza (center), a staff member with Right to Life of Central California, interacts with UCLA students in front of the JFA Exhibit on Bruin Plaza.

Marcos Espinoza (center), a staff member with Right to Life of Central California, interacts with UCLA students in front of the JFA Exhibit on Bruin Plaza.

Jenny asked me about the issue of a woman having to care for a child conceived in rape.  I took great care to share just how evil I think rape is and how we need to take better care of the woman in that situation.  After spending a significant amount of time talking with Jenny, I shared another belief that I hold strongly.  I said, “You know, often when women are in the midst of an unwanted pregnancy, pro-life people come alongside them and say, ‘Don’t get an abortion!’  What if, instead, we said, ‘Let me help you’?  I think we need to do a better job of coming alongside the woman and the unborn child inside of her.”

After a short pause, Jenny looked at me with eyes wide.  She said, “You just turned on the lightbulb for me.  I realized we've been talking about the woman, but there is a child involved in this, too.”  She then asked me what she could do about abortion.  She went over to our “Should Abortion Remain Legal?” poll table and signed the side that said “No.”  I gave her the JFA Exhibit Brochure and showed her how to share it with a friend.  I also gave her the contact information for a local pregnancy care center so that if she ever encounters someone considering an abortion, she herself could say, “Let me help you.”

I’m so thankful that God enabled me to face my fear and talk to Jenny.  The fruit of that conversation has shown me how a small step can accomplish a lot.  I pray that God continues to strengthen her to take a stand for unborn children. 

-CK Wisner, for the JFA Team

* Scott Klusendorf (Life Training Institute) gave us our initial formulation of “Trot Out the Toddler.”  For a step-by-step explanation and dialogue excerpts, see


In this Impact Report, JFA trainer CK Wisner tells the story of one of her conversations from JFA’s UCLA outreach in June.  What I love about CK’s description of this conversation is that we get to see the specific decisions CK made at different points which helped one UCLA student change her mind about abortion. 

This is a different kind of conversation, the sort that 49 staff members and volunteers created many times over during two days at UCLA.  Among those volunteers were mission trip participants from Houston, Nebraska, Central California, and China (University of Kansas student), who have already taken what they learned back to their communities.  Thanks for helping JFA train pro-life advocates to create conversations that are changing minds and engaging hearts in Los Angeles and beyond.

- Stephen Wagner, Executive Director

By Tammy Cook, Director of Human Resource

There is one thing we can always be certain of on every campus:  Encountering students who are either considering abortion or who have had an abortion.  Our hope is to connect them as quickly as possible with valuable life-saving resources. 

Having a local pregnancy resource center (PRC) table near our exhibit is invaluable.  Because we’ve been blessed to have the presence of PRC tables manned by directors and volunteers, many lives have been saved and impacted.  Here is one of those stories.

Six years ago I had an encounter with a student on campus that I have never forgotten.  Her name was Christina. 

As she viewed the exhibit I asked, “What do you think about this exhibit?” 

She looked at me and replied angrily,

“I’ve had three of these, what do you think I think about it?” 

My heart broke as I expressed sorrow for her pain.  After sensing my spirit of compassion instead of condemnation, Christina shared her story with me. 

With her first two pregnancies, each boyfriend split after hearing the news.  She got involved with a third guy who promised he would stick by her no matter what.  But she once again discovered she was pregnant and this guy turned out to be the same as the others.

Thank you ... you’ve given me my life back.
— Christina

With each pregnancy her mom informed her she would not continue her financial support for her education if Christina didn’t have an abortion.  Her mother also reminded her each time that she wouldn’t be able to continue playing soccer competitively and she would lose her scholarship if she didn’t get an abortion.  Scared and unsure, she chose to follow her mother’s advice each time.

After she finished her story, I asked her if she would be interested in talking with someone who knew her pain firsthand.  She nodded yes. 

I walked with her to the PRC table nearby.  Christina picked up a brochure that listed over 10 symptoms of post-abortion syndrome.  I’ve never forgotten her response: 

“I thought I was the only one feeling this way.”

She spoke to Terri, the PRC director, who had also had three abortions.  Terri shared hope with Christina for the pain and anguish she had been feeling.  Christina took the information on the abortion recovery class that was starting the following week.   She then hugged me and thanked me before she left.

Two days later, Christina came back.  As she walked toward me I noticed something was different.  She was smiling and immediately gave me a hug.  I’ve never forgotten her words: 

“Thank you so much, Tammy. I feel like you’ve given me my life back.  I’m going to start going back to church and also start going through the bible study program at the pregnancy center.  I am a Christian and I think it would be good for me to get back to God.”
Report By David Lee (JFA Founder), 2010
Jinny interacts with fellow Pasadena City College students in 2009.

Jinny interacts with fellow Pasadena City College students in 2009.

Jinny, a Pasadena City College (PCC) student, contacted Justice For All (JFA) in fall 2008 to ask if we would ever consider bringing JFA’s training program to her school.

Our initial response: “Probably not in the near future.” However, we encouraged Jinny to pray.  At that time JFA’s May 2009 California training plan only included UCLA and UC-San Diego.

Early in 2009 we saw that UCLA was not going to be possible.  Jinny was still very interested so we began working with her to substitute PCC for UCLA.

Jinny, a 19-year-old, is the ideal student to sponsor JFA’s training program.

She always returned calls, always went the extra mile, reserved numerous training locations at PCC, and recruited volunteers to participate in the JFA training program!

Jinny even took a part-time job to help cover JFA’s expenses related to coming to PCC!  She is the first student in a decade of campus work to take such steps to insure that her school mates would have an opportunity to understand the truth about abortion, and the love of Christ.

Above, left to right: Sarah Torre, Focus on the Family Institute volunteer, Rebecca Haschke, JFA’s newest intern, Steve Wagner, JFA training director, Jinny Li (wearing blue visor) and Jon Wagner, JFA staff.

Above, left to right: Sarah Torre, Focus on the Family Institute volunteer, Rebecca Haschke, JFA’s newest intern, Steve Wagner, JFA training director, Jinny Li (wearing blue visor) and Jon Wagner, JFA staff.

As a result, we had every needed reservation and also hit our training goal (75) for the number of volunteers who participated.

Jinny took a part-time job to help pay JFA’s expenses to bring its training to PCC!

JFA’s training equips volunteers like Jinny to engage anyone, anywhere, at any time with the truth about abortion, and integrate their Hope (I Peter 3:15), Faith (I Corinthians 15:3-4) and Comfort (2 Corinthians 1:3-4) into the dialogue.

So it was not a surprise three months later to receive this email from Jinny:

“Sunday night, I got a phone call from a friend.  She was crying because she found out she's pregnant...  I called her Monday and Tuesday but she didn't pick up.  I finally saw her today.
She wants an abortion.  She’s going to Planned Parenthood tomorrow for information.  I’m trying to convince her to keep her baby and to go with me to a crisis pregnancy center.  Can you please pray that she changes her mind?  Thanks, Jinny”

What Jinny didn’t say in her email is that when she met with her friend — Amanda (not her real name), she walked her through the JFA Exhibit Brochure in order to help Amanda understand life before birth (pp. 2- 4) and death by abortion (p.5).  Before leaving that day, Amanda actually asked Jinny if she could see the JFA Exhibit Brochure again!

Despite Jinny’s best efforts, Amanda’s abortion was still scheduled for August 28.  Jinny called JFA to ask what we thought about her calling Amanda’s parents to inform them of their daughter’s continued plan to abort their first grandchild.

Jinny had several fears with making such a call.  What would be the position of Amanda’s parents on the scheduled abortion?  Would a call to Amanda’s parents harm Jinny’s future opportunity to talk with Amanda?

When it became clear that Amanda was not going to return Jinny’s calls before the scheduled abortion date, Jinny called Amanda’s parents.

They were horrified to learn what Amanda was about to do and said they would immediately speak with her.

Jinny’s only earthly contact with Amanda for the next month was through Amanda’s mother.  However, Jinny had plenty of spiritual contact with Amanda through the hundreds of people that Jinny persuaded to pray for Amanda and her baby.

Long story short, here's a portion of the email Jinny received on September 9:

"Hey Jinny. ... Well I just wanted to tell u sorry if I was a little harsh on you. I just felt like it wasn’t your place to tell my parents. But I know that you were trying to help and maybe it was for the best that they found out early on.
Anyways I think I'm keeping the baby! So I’ll keep you updated and send you pics when the little one is born....  I realize that I would probably regret killing it but I would never regret my baby.” —Amanda
“I realize that I would probably regret killing it but I would never regret my baby.”

The last sentence in Amanda’s email speaks to the successful completion of JFA’s mission through Jinny: train students to make abortion unthinkable for their family, friends and strangers, one person at a time.

Words fail to express the value of your support that enables JFA to train students like Jinny, not simply for a JFA outreach event, but for the many divine appointments that they will have throughout their lifetime!

Jinny, now attending San Francisco State, has already asked if we will bring the JFA training program to her new school!  We told her to pray!


Impact Report: July 2012

Mum was the word. She was too scared to tell even her mom.

Gloria and Josh at Metro State, Denver, CO (April 2011)

Gloria and Josh at Metro State, Denver, CO (April 2011)

It was a sunny afternoon in April on the first day of our outreach at Metro State in Denver, Colorado. A petite, dark-eyes, raven-haired, Hispanic girl stood staring at the Justice For All Exhibit. "Gloria" had recently learned that she was eight weeks pregnant. She shared that she was trying to decide what to do and felt that God had been sending her signs not to abort. She said that she never walked through the area where the exhibit was stationed. Gloria thought our 18-foot-tall exhibit was definitely the biggest sign that God would send her way.

She had not yet told her parents and was afraid to do so. My good friend and fellow missionary, Bubba, put one hand on her shoulder and one hand on mine. In a holy triangle, he prayed one of the most touching prayers I have ever heard, asking for God's grace and courage to be upon Gloria. The next day Gloria sought me out and introduced her boyfriend "Josh." They had stayed up all night excitedly talking about their future. After encouraging them further and exchanging contact information, they left to go visit Alternatives Pregnancy Center to get free help and support.

On Cinco de Mayo I sent Gloria an email to see how she was doing, and I asked if she had talked to her Mom. She wrote back:

Some days I'm more worried than others, and this stresses me out almost daily... I can't stop thinking about the pregnancy and how it is going to change my life... I haven't told my mom yet. I really don't know when or how I'm going to tell her. I'm very worried she'll be disappointed and upset...but frankly this is something that I can't keep postponing... Josh and I are doing great. He is very supportive (just as he always has been), and I am very thankful for him...
Anyways, thank you for writing to me; it's nice to...know that there is somebody there willing to listen, or in this case read my thoughts, so thank you.

God did not mean for people to handle the pressure of major life events, like having a baby, alone. They need support. At this point, Josh was Gloria's only support. I advised her to talk to her mom soon.

How did we know Gloria was in need? How did we know she was struggling with hear and indecision? As Christians we cannot wait in our church buildings and homes for people in need to stumble across our paths or announce to the world that they are trying to make a life-and-death decision. At a minimum, we must be willing to ask questions and start a conversation. At Justice For All, that is our mission. We will teach you the questions to ask. We will model for you how to start a conversation. Then, we will model for you how to start a conversation. Then, we will go with you to find the next Gloria who needs you to be an ambassador for Christ (II Cor. 5:20).

Just after Independence Day I was sorting some pictures from the spring when I came across one of Gloria and Josh. I sent it to them immediately and asked Gloria if she had talked to her mom. She responded:

Oh wow...thank you so much for that picture! It's great! I can't wait to show just showcases one of the many steps we have taken throughout my pregnancy...
Concerning my mom, you're not going to believe me, but I actually still haven't told her. My absolute deadline is next week because I'm having 21-week ultrasound... I would like for my mom to be there for that....

She finally talked to her mom. Just after Thanksgiving I sat by the fireplace basking in the radiance of our freshly adorned Christmas tree when I heard the familiar ping! from my computer. I only thought I was feeling in the Christmas spirit before, but then I read Gloria's email:

I am happy to announce that...our son was born on Monday...weighing in at almost nine pounds! ... He is beautiful and healthy and vivacious. Josh and I are very proud and very much in love with our son... My mom has also been an incredible support and was by my side every step of the way...
I wanted to let you know and your team made a huge contribution to the quality of my life: You indirectly helped birth my son, and...this one life you did touch is breathing today because of the selflessness, love, and devotion your team has for the beauty of LIFE.
Your efforts are never in vain.

The people surrounding Gloria with encouragement may have made her choice easier. Beginning with Josh and the immediate pro-life community, then expanding to her mom and whole family, they were all there for her, encouraging her, throwing baby showers, and loving her baby. Still, she had struggled with what to do, and she had even waited through over half the pregnancy to tell her mom. Imagine how hard it must be to have no support, and on top of that, to have you peers and culture tell you that you have a fundamental "right" to kill your child.

Once we as Christians have been brave enough to ask a question and have a conversation, we can't stop there. After all, who is my neighbor? It is not enough to simply speak up for the unborn. We must surround women with strong support, emotionally and in practical ways. Fathers, families, churches, and resources centers must be more than passively poised for action--they must proactively find, encourage, and equip women to recognize the lies of our culture and to embrace the truth, knowing that they will be doing the right thing and knowing that they will be supported.

Gloria and Josh's son, William, at five weeks

Gloria and Josh's son, William, at five weeks

Gloria now looks back with clarity and confidence that she did the right thing. She wants other moms to know that they can get to the other side, too. They don't have to remain mum; they can go to mom, or to other sources of support to help them do the right thing. Here is Gloria's note from New Year's:

Happy New year! I hope 2012 brings you infinite joy, success, love, and many good, deep belly laughs.
My son is five weeks old today and beautiful and healthy as ever. I wanted to thank you for sharing our story. If William's life could save others, and provide hope and inspiration to other young moms who are confused and scared just like I was, then by all means, share our story with whomever you think may benefit from hearing about William...

--John Michener, for the JFA team

Impact Report: November 2012


We describe the JFA training program in terms of Seat Work, Feet Work, and Repeat Work.  

The duty of JFA mentors is to guide their student volunteers through an interactive seminar and then shepherd them as they practice their skills at an outreach where they talk to people in real time, many of whom really disagree!  The expected outcome?  Students will experience making a difference, and they will want to continue using their skills to change hearts and save lives.  In other words:

Seat Work (SW) + Feet Work (FW) = Repeat Work (RW)

From start to finish, Conny’s story exemplifies this simple equation.  See for yourself.

The Story

Gloria and Josh at Metro State, Denver, CO (April 2011)

Gloria and Josh at Metro State, Denver, CO (April 2011)

Last year I participated in the Justice For All training program.  I had several conversations during the outreach day, but one in particular changed my world.

“Amy” was writing on the Free Speech Board when I asked her how she felt about abortion.  She responded that it did not matter how she felt and that we should all die for putting girls at her school through the trauma of seeing pictures of abortion.  Amy seemed to hate me without even having talked to me first.

I was distraught by this.  I hated that my actions were causing pain, but I thought of the countless children who would die that day, and I stood my ground.  Little did I know that Amy’s friend “Lisa” had been raped repeatedly by the same assailant, resulting in five pregnancies.

Each time that Lisa had become pregnant, she had gotten an abortion.  Her rapist was eventually found, and he is now in prison.  He will never leave jail.

It was Amy, the girl standing right in front of me, who had gone with Lisa each time to Planned Parenthood.  Amy had been Lisa’s “Rock of Gibraltar.”

I ended up consoling Amy for the better part of an hour.  Then, she started asking questions about the things that Planned Parenthood had told her and Lisa.  For example, someone there had told them that babies don’t have heart beats until ten weeks.  She related other misrepresentations that I couldn't believe.

By the end of our conversation, she no longer hated me, and she asked for my contact information.  I felt such love for her.  As she left, I promised I would continue to talk to her.

Over the next month we talked—not about abortion, but about life.  We became good friends.  I was there for her when she had bad days, and we bonded.  I learned about her schooling, her faith, her friends, and finally, I learned about her boyfriend.

Her boyfriend…  He was not the ripest apple on the tree, but she insisted she loved him, and they were sexually active.  Eventually, he cheated on her and hurt her deeply.  She came to me to talk about it, and we hung out together.

The day Amy found out that her boyfriend had cheated on her was significant in another way:  she also learned that she was pregnant.  She had no idea what to do, so I took her to a pregnancy center.

She decided she would have the baby and let her be adopted.  I was overwhelmed with joy.  It was probably the best day of my life.  We laughed and cried together.  Then, to my amazement, she attributed her daughter's life to me!

Amy has since had the baby and given her my middle name!  The baby has been adopted by a wonderful Christian family who love her extremely.

Why do I tell this story?  I hope to inspire others to action.  A wonderful child of God was brought into this world by an hour-long conversation!  To have had this experience is the most encouraging and wonderful gift I have ever received.

-Conny Fiedler


Such a simple equation.  What a dramatic sum!  Conny graduated last spring from Pius X High School, a private Christian school in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Conny and her classmates first participated in the JFA training program in 2011.  I was privileged to mentor Conny this year during her school’s second year of offering the Justice For All training program to its students.

Thanks for helping us mentor and shepherd students like Conny through Seat Work and Feet Work and into their own opportunities for Repeat Work.

-John Michener, for the JFA Team (2012)


(Note: John Michener served as a Justice For All trainer from 2010-2014.  He is now the Director of Oklahomans United for Life)


Impact Report: January 2013


A friend pulled Miriam out of bed one Saturday morning to take her to a pro-life training seminar JFA missionary Jon Wagner had arranged when he was a student at Azusa Pacific University.  It was the first in a series of small steps that ultimately led to a big decision — right inside an abortion clinic.

Time Magazine proclaimed on January 14, 2013, that “40 Years Ago, Abortion-Rights Activists Won an Epic Victory with Roe v. Wade.  They’ve Been Losing Ever Since.”  If Time is correct, we think the efforts of pro-life advocates like Miriam are the most exciting illustration of progress.  It’s small steps like hers, along with the small steps of each of us, that can change our culture.  

The Story

I’m writing to share with you a story of how your influence as an organization is like a pebble in a pond, whose ripples keep spreading and spreading.

In 2005, I was fortunate enough to attend JFA’s Abortion: From Debate to Dialogue seminar.  It ignited a passion which led me to attend your March 2005 trip to Texas.  I’ve since been to four more seminars and three more campus outreaches.  Needless to say, JFA’s ministry has etched itself on my heart.

A couple years ago, when it was my turn to bring the devotion to my family’s weekly dinner night, I decided to present a mini version of the JFA seminar, using my JFA training materials.  I passed out the JFA Exhibit brochure, and I even facilitated my parents and siblings and their significant others to role-play “pro-choice person” and “pro-life person.”  It went very well, and that was that. I hadn’t thought about that night for a long time, until it was brought back into my mind in a very big way.

“JFA’s ministry has etched itself on my heart.”

“JFA’s ministry has etched itself on my heart.”

When I gave that mini training, my sister was dating a nice guy named “Damien,” so he was there for the training.  Later on, he and my sister went their separate ways and Damien began dating another girl, “Mindy.”  Recently, my sister came back into contact with Damien, and he shared an incredible story with her.

A few months after he began dating Mindy, they found out she was pregnant.  Being young students with only part-time jobs, they decided on abortion.  They made the appointment and went into the clinic.  When Mindy left to have the procedure done, Damien sat alone in the waiting room.  He said that suddenly all the things he had learned that night at the mini JFA training came flooding back to his mind.  

He became very frantic and forced his way to the room where Mindy was.  He begged and pleaded with her not to go through with the abortion.  In those few seconds, he blurted out everything he remembered from the training and told her he’d do whatever it took to make it work.  She said she’d think about it; then the clinic personnel forced him to leave.  Damien sat in his car and cried for two hours while he assumed his girlfriend was aborting their child.

Later that day, she called him and told him that she thought about what he had said, and she had decided not to go through with the abortion.  Today, his beautiful little girl, “Sophia,” is the joy of his life, and he told my sister that he can’t imagine life without sweet Sophia.

- Miriam Bernard

Miriam talks to a University of Texas student during her first JFA mission trip.

Miriam talks to a University of Texas student during her first JFA mission trip.


Miriam’s story is a series of small steps — steps which may not have seemed to her to change hearts or save lives.  When she had the natural opportunity to share what she had learned with her family, she took it.  She was doing what JFA trainers regularly teach in our seminar: focus on being a faithful ambassador for Christ and leave the results to him.

Once in a while God gives us a glimpse of the work he’s doing through that faithfulness, and in Miriam’s case we all have the joy of seeing how her small steps had a big impact in the lives of Damien, Mindy, and Sophia.

Those who support JFA also take steps to make sure our team can keep working full-time to save children from abortion.  Sometimes, to them, their steps seem insignificant, but God is pleased to use those small steps to make a big impact.  

The close of Miriam's letter is as much a note to our faithful supporters, as it is to our staff:

THANK YOU for the impact you have made on me, and for giving me the tools to share the truth about abortion in love and common sense with people like Damien. One can never know when those morsels of truth will surface and affect major decision-making.  Because of JFA, Sophia is alive and loving her daddy today.  

- Stephen Wagner
Director of Training

Impact Report: October 2013


JFA’s alumni want to do one thing with their JFA training: practice.  They attend multiple Seat Work and Feet Work events, and they want to teach others.  They are a treasure because they come back time and again to JFA outreach events to help us reach thousands of students on campuses each year.  They’re also a treasure because of what their JFA training has enabled them to do when JFA trainers can’t be present.

In this Impact Report from October 2013, Kansas volunteer Anthony Trent shares in his own words the story of how he went from the fire of his second JFA training experience to the frying pan of a party of naysayers.  He was ready to turn the debate into a dialogue.

Thank you for helping us give Anthony and hundreds of others like him the tools they need to be confident when the pressure is on. 

The Story

“It’s become something that I do almost instinctively now — asking the right kinds of questions.”     - Anthony Trent

“It’s become something that I do almost instinctively now asking the right kinds of questions.”     - Anthony Trent

Last weekend I had a pretty incredible experience.   It was Labor Day weekend, a Sunday night, and I happened to be in Wichita visiting a friend who was hosting a party.  Nothing seemed to be abnormal or different than most group functions I’ve attended.   Of course, there was an understanding that many of this friend’s friends didn’t really share the same beliefs I held. 

The timing was interesting because a week beforehand I had participated in my second JFA seminar and outreach at Wichita State University.   Many of the people at the party were WSU students. 

Later in the evening, the subject of the JFA outreach was brought up.  After saying I participated in that event, one of the guys there said, “Yeah, well, we were making fun of that all day it was there.  It was stupid.”  I replied, “Why was it stupid?  We were asking questions and promoting dialogue with pro-choice students.”  After asking more questions, it was clear he didn’t have a reason for belittling the outreach, and he admitted it.

This conversation, not surprisingly, sparked a debate about abortion.   While the room seemed to erupt in aggressive talking points and pseudo-listening, a person named Cole and I had a one-on-one conversation about abortion.   Cole believed abortion was a woman’s right during the first two trimesters of pregnancy.  We found common ground that third-trimester abortions were immoral and that it makes sense to consider the unborn to be human persons when the pregnancy is far enough along that premature babies can survive.

I later found out that Cole considered personhood to be based on a sort of self-awareness—“the ability to know I exist independently.”  As I proposed to him the Equal Rights Argument and how his explanation of rights based on self-awareness excluded newborns and third-trimester children, though, he knew it couldn’t work.  The conversation went on for three hours as he tried to propose new functional abilities that might bestow human rights.  I then asked him, “What is the one trait that every person in this room has in common?”  We came to the conclusion that it was our human nature.  As we talked even more, Cole came to the conclusion that abortion should be made illegal, even in cases of rape.

Not only was my conversation with Cole refreshing, but the other people at the party also gave me some hope.  As one girl came back from a late-night McDonalds run, she sighed, “Oh, another judgmental pro-lifer.”  Another person spoke up: “Oh no, this guy is different.  He’s listening and is making an intelligent, logical case.”

Now back to the friend I was visiting in Wichita.  She attended the Abortion: From Debate to Dialogue seminar a week beforehand, and she was silently overhearing the conversation the whole time.  The next day we talked about the conversation, and she said, “I finally understood how that training can be put into a real conversation and that it really does work.”

This is why I support Justice For All.  It’s small moments like these that give me assurance we can win the culture for Life.  Just one year ago, I would not have been able to have productive conversations like these.  This is the purpose of the training.  Rather than just holding a brochure or pointing students toward an exhibit, the purpose is to use the skills we’ve learned as an ambassador for our Lord, and to do that on a daily basis.  I can’t thank this staff enough for equipping me to love those with whom I speak.  Thank you, and God bless.

                                     - Anthony Trent


After reading this story, I asked Anthony whether he would have spoken up at the party before his JFA training.  “I definitely would have entered into the conversation,” he said, “but it would have been much more like a debate.  I would have been a really bad ambassador…  I would have just taken his comments, blown them up, and intellectually humiliated him.”  Fresh from two rounds of Seat Work and Feet Work with JFA, though, Anthony went into the party living out JFA’s Three Essential Skills: asking questions with an open heart, listening to understand, and finding common ground when possible.

When the outreach event was mocked, Anthony didn’t respond in kind.  He asked a clarifying question.  Instead of reveling in a one-against-many showdown featuring him at the center, Anthony opted for a one-on-one format in which he could listen.

When Anthony learned that Cole was pro-choice, he could have simply listed off his best pro-life arguments, whether Cole was interested or not.  Instead, Anthony started with common ground: adults deserve an equal right to life.  Then he labored with Cole for three hours over Cole’s explanations of those equal rights.  When it became clear to Cole that his explanations were flawed, Anthony was ready—ready to give him a hand up with the more satisfying explanation that we deserve equal rights because we have the same human nature.  It was then a very small step for Cole to embrace the unborn as humans who share that nature.  If you want to learn how to approach a conversation from the Equal Rights perspective like Anthony did, join us for an upcoming JFA training event.  Until then, enjoy stories from JFA missionaries in a newsletter collection entitled “The Equal Rights Argument."

Since the party Anthony has continued to put his JFA training into practice.  He’s created other Repeat Work conversations in his everyday life, and he’s joined the JFA team for six additional days of outreach, including one he arranged on his own campus (see photo above).  For more discussion with Anthony about the value of practicing the Three Essential Skills, see my interview with him at

What could have been a disaster became a delight for Anthony, for Cole, and for the others at the party.  Thank you for helping us train pro-life advocates like Anthony to change hearts and minds in their everyday lives.

- Stephen Wagner, Director of Training


“...I saw the [Justice For All] exhibit at the University of North Texas, one month before I got pregnant with Nicholas.

Nick could have easily been an abortion photo on your exhibit [if I had not seen it first].

God…used [the JFA] exhibit and my pregnancy to get mine and Nicholas' father's attention in a BIG way.

Nick is the lover of my soul...and I love him too -- SO MUCH!

All things are possible through Christ, who strengthens us!"

—email from Nick’s mother, 8/16/2006

Reprinted with permission.